Should my tech conference / community have a Code of Conduct? – Recommended Resources

(Header Photo from CSSConf EU 2015)

The short answer is here: tl;dr

Discussions about the necessity and relevance of Codes of Conduct for tech communities and at conferences or other events has been returning every few months over the past years. I’ve put together a list of fantastic resources about the topic that were written by great people. So I thought I’d make the list public here (jump to beginning of list).

From my (privileged) perspective as a co-organiser of conferences, speaker, attendee, and member of Open Source communities, I find Codes of Conduct extremely important. I’ve seen their relevance play out in practice many times over the past years.

But beyond my personal opinion, there are numerous very important reasons to adopt a Code of Conduct for your event / community. Continue reading “Should my tech conference / community have a Code of Conduct? – Recommended Resources”

How to prepare and write a tech conference talk

Why I’m writing this post

A few weeks ago, @Charlotteis asked on Twitter about resources for preparing / giving conference talks. Their tweet reminded me that I had meant to write down my process for a very long time. So here it is. I’m planning to write two posts about this topic – this first one will focus on preparation of talks (so basically everything that happens before I pack my bags to travel to the event). I’ll write about everything related with actually giving the talk in the 2nd post. 

Also: you can invite me to speak at your event. Topics I speak about include tech and Open Source culture, communities, diversity and inclusion, mental health and empathy. And I have a few open speaking slots in 2016 left. I’m also available for hire. But now, to our topic.

Almost two years ago, I gave my first talk at a frontend meetup, and, a few weeks later, spoke at my first tech conference. Since then, I have given six talks and three keynotes at tech conferences around Europe. I’ve also been parts of the orga teams of two conferences and have been part of committees that did the first blind-selection round of proposals.

There are a few things which frame my experience and capabilities in preparing and giving conf talks:

  1. I’m an introvert.
  2. I really love public speaking. But I get ~extremely~ nervous beforehand (more on that and how I (try to) deal with it in part 2).
  3. I’m not a software developer. With one exception, my talks are usually not technical, meaning that they usually center around human-related topics. This also means that there are some things you may be confronted with that I don’t have to deal with, like working demos, displaying code samples, or similar.
  4. Also, I’m a white, cis, able-bodied woman who doesn’t have to do care work, so I usually have more or less enough time on hand for my preparation. 

Given this, some of the things I outline here may not work for you. But hopefully, there are a few useful tips in there that come in handy for you. I’ve added a bunch of links to more resources at the end of each section. There are also several speakers that have inspired me and that I’ve learned from. If you have more useful tips or resources, please don’t hesitate to leave a comment or get in touch!

IMG_7556-600x399-2

This post has now turned out much, much longer than I had planned. So here’s a brief table of contents in an attempt to give you an overview. To skip the overview and get right into the post, click hereContinue reading “How to prepare and write a tech conference talk”

No place to hide: January

I did
photo shootings
some copywriting
wait for a phone call
make a list of conferences
update my website
finally upload my photos of Berlin’s most expensive construction site (aka WTF BER)

I saw
the snow
the Alster
someone
very expensive buildings in a part of Berlin I’d never been to
a community shutting down that had once been very important to me

I heard
“Monday, Wednesday and Friday, they’re allowed to party for 24 hours.” (A drug researcher on rat experiments in a documentary I watched)

I said
thank you
hello again

I was
afraid of everything (or so)

I went to
Hamburg
bed

I had
too much coffee
an important meeting
not enough pizza
an idea

https://www.flickr.com/photos/101906241@N07/24509637291/in/album-72157663853283536/

I realised:
Even if many years go by: in the end, there’s not necessarily as much going on in our lives as we may think.

Status:
Well, actually…